A Tonga sailing itinerary covers a cruising ground from Vava′u, the largest island of the Vava′u group, south for about 15 nautical miles and 15 nautical miles east to west (see Tonga maps). Within this area are numerous uninhabited wooded islands ringed with white-sand beaches and coral reefs ideal for snorkeling. Passages between some of the best anchorages in the South Pacific are typically short, with stops along the way to explore the islands, snorkel on the reefs, or simply anchor for a relaxing lunch in an unspoiled setting, reminiscent of what the Pacific must have been like for Captain James Cook when he sailed Tongan waters in the mid-1700s.

Day 1

Ile de Kapa

In 1781, Francisco Maurelle sailed the waters of Vava′u, claiming the islands for Spain, but Spain never did take control. Neither did any other European power, making Tonga unique. It was the only part of Polynesia to remain free from colonial influences. The monarchy established at about 900 A.D. has remained in place and Tongan culture has remained largely undisturbed since the first Polynesians arrived about 3,000 years ago. The anchorage at Kapa Island that bears Maurelle’s name is where he evidently stopped to refill the ship’s water casks. Cruising in Kapa Island waters affords you the delightful opportunity to retrace the path of history.

Day 2

Hunga Island

Yachting in Hunga Island waters brings you to a scenic and wooded outpost on the extreme west side of the Vava′u group. Hunga is best known for its magnificent and nearly landlocked lagoon. To the south is Foeata Island, which is a popular location for snorkeling.

Day 3

Vaka'eitu Island

Vaka′eitu Island is linked to Nuapapu by a stunningly beautiful reef, forming a giant horseshoe-shaped bay. The small island of Lape rises 180 feet and serves as a picturesque backdrop to this scenic anchorage. Vaka′eitu cruising is a pure delight.

Day 4

Fonua'one'one

Located just over three nautical miles southwest of Euakafa Island, Fonua′one′one is an islet sprouting from a surrounding reef. It is the essence of the South Pacific, remote and beautiful, which is the main reason why Fonua′one′one cruising is so popular.

Day 5

Tapana Island

Tapana Island protrudes west from a beautiful reef that runs north to Pangiamotu. The two islands and the reef form a picturesque bay with a well-protected anchorage, making Tapana Island yachting an adventure into unparaleled beauty.

Day 6

Kenutu Island

The interior of Kenutu Island is volcanic rock and overgrown, emblematic of its remote location. The fabulous beach is well worth the effort of cruising in Kenutu waters to explore.

Day 7

Olo'ua Island

Olo′ua Island is one of three extending south from Vava′u on the eastern edge of the cruising grounds. A magnificent reef fronts the east side of Olo′ua, Mafana, and Ofu islands. Cruising in Olo′ua waters is a highlight of any Tonga yacht charter.

Day 8

Taunga Island

A prominent Tongan family has owned the lovely estate on the island for many years. It isn’t surprising that they would choose Taunga, one of the most beautiful islands in the Vava′u group, making Taunga cruising a must for most boaters on a Tonga yacht charter. Pretty beaches and the surrounding reefs and islets create an idyllic place to anchor for the night or for a day stop.

Day 9

Ile de Kapa

In 1781, Francisco Maurelle sailed the waters of Vava′u, claiming the islands for Spain, but Spain never did take control. Neither did any other European power, making Tonga unique. It was the only part of Polynesia to remain free from colonial influences. The monarchy established at about 900 A.D. has remained in place and Tongan culture has remained largely undisturbed since the first Polynesians arrived about 3,000 years ago. The anchorage at Kapa Island that bears Maurelle’s name is where he evidently stopped to refill the ship’s water casks. Cruising in Kapa Island waters affords you the delightful opportunity to retrace the path of history.

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