General Conditions
Summers are hot and dry, with temperatures above 30° C. Spring and autumn are generally mild, but during both seasons sudden hot and cold spells frequently occur in the region. Annual precipitation averages about 500-800 millimetres with actual amounts determined by elevation. In Istanbul and around the Sea of Marmara the climate is moderate (winter 4° C and summer 27° C).
In Western Anatolia, there is a mild Mediterranean climate with average temperatures of 9° C in winter and 29° C in summer. On the southern coast of Anatolia the similar climatic condition are observed.
The climate of the Anatolian Plateau is a steppe climate. There is a great temperature difference between day and night. Rainfall is low but it usually in form of snow. The average temperature is 23°C in summer. The climate in the Black Sea area is wet, and humid (summer 23° C, winter 7° C).
The dominant winds in Turkey are:
* The Meltemi: The meltemi starts blowing at the end of May. It is full strength in July and August and dies in October.The strength varies between 15 and 40 knots. Between Kusadasi and Bodrum it blows from the North. After Bodrum it is more West and follows the coast. It loses strength the more you sail east. In the summer the winds are influenced by the relief, you can have very strong gusts in the channels or behind the islands.
* The Poyraz: North or North East
* The Lodos: South or South East. More frequent in winter, it is a depression with low and dark clouds. They can blow in gusts of wind in April or at the end of October.

 

Historical Weather (Averages by month):


Month

°F Max

°F Min

°C Max

°C Min

Ave Precip (in)

Ave Precip (mm)

Ave Water Temp (°F)

Ave Water Temp (°C)

Ave Wind Speed

January

59

41

15

5

8.5

216

63

17

9

February

59

41

15

5

6.3

160

61

16

9

March

64

45

18

7

3.8

96

61

16

9

April

70

48

21

9

1.8

46

63

17

9

May

79

55

26

13

1.0

26

66

19

9

June

88

63

31

17

0.4

11

73

23

10

July

93

68

34

20

0.2

4

75

24

10

August

93

68

34

20

0.2

5

77

25

10

September

88

63

31

17

0.9

24

77

25

9

October

79

55

26

13

3.1

80

73

23

8

November

68

48

20

9

5.5

139

68

20

7

December

61

43

16

6

9.2

233

64

18

8

 

Tides
In the Eastern Mediterranean, the tide range is very small: 30 cm to 60 cm (one to two feet depending on location) including the variation of level due to atmospheric pressure and dominant winds.

Weather Forecast
When you arrive at the base, we will provide you with a weather forecast for the next 24 hours.  The weather forecast during your cruise can be seen on all television channels: Tavernas and restaurants show weather programmes just after the news at 8.50pm. Wind direction and speed are clearly indicated on a map.
Harbour Offices receive a weather forecast regularly. A weather forecast is also available on the web at www.meteoturk.com 

On your VHF: It is possible to call the coastguard on channel 16 and ask them the weather forecast for your zone after telling them your VHF signal code and the name of your boat. On your radio receiver: On TRT Radio Nationale, frequency 96 MHz FM a weather forecast is given in English after the news at 9.00 am (local time). You can also listen to Greek radio which broadcast the weather forecast for the Aegean Sea. For example: Radio Rhodes 1493kHz (201m) in Greek and English at 6.30/7.00 am.

Buoying
In all European waters, the International A is used and not the B system used in American and Caribbean waters.Leaving the harbour, red beacons will be to Starboard and green beacons to Port (the opposite of the B system). You will also find yellow and black beacons called «Cardinals» that do not exist in the B system. Do not hesitate to ask our base manager if you have any questions. 

Restricted Zones

Karaagac Limani : It is not permitted to enter or moor in this bay, located to the east of Marmaris. It is a military zone. 

Olu Deniz : It is not permitted to enter this bay. You can moor just before the entrance and visit the bay with your dinghy. 

Hazards 

We would like to draw your attention to two of the most frequent causes of accidents in our region: grounding and propeller fouling.

- Running aground: Running aground is unfortunately, frequent and causes enormous damage: rupture of flooring and partitions, water infiltration, injury to the crew and interruption to the cruise. The risk of running aground is even greater because of the beauty of the area, the absence of tides and an open coastline. It is easy to forget the primary rules of navigation. Pay careful attention to the detail on the charts, the coastal guides and nautical instructions, and check them regularly. Constantly be aware of your surroundings. If you have any doubts, (after consulting nautical charts, navigation ruler, handbearing compass,etc.) do not take the risk!

Electronic instruments (sounder, GPS, etc.) are navigational aids and you must not rely on their information only.

- Propeller fouling: This can also cause severe damage: the propeller shaft may become bent, the bracket may be bent or torn out, the engine can be torn off its mounting, the cutlass bearing may be damaged and a serious leak may occur. Before starting the engine, check that no ropes, painters or sheets are overhanging. When sailing with the engine, watch for nets and floating ropes or fishing lines.

If the engine suddenly stops, check that there is nothing caught around the propeller (the cause of 98% of engine stops) before starting again. Check that there are no leaks around the stuffing box.

- Towing

In the Eastern Mediterranean it frequently happens that the captain of a vessel that has taken another vessel (or vessel that has been abandoned) on tow has the right to claim ownership or compensation for the towed boat. For a chartered yacht this means confiscation by the port authorities and the end of the cruise. To prevent any unpleasantness from being towed, always make sure you have enough fuel, avoid going aground or damaging the propeller shaft.

Do not be towed for a minor problem.

Beware that assistance at sea is an obligation and that towage can be negotiated. If towage is really necessary for the safety of the crew and the boat, come to an agreement before a witness (use the VHF).

Never take the other boat’s towline-it is like handing your boat over to them.

Instead, give your own towline. Should they refuse, their intentions become obvious.

Inform the base as soon as possible so they can take the necessary steps with the insurance company.

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